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How Important is Indoor Air Quality?

How Important is Indoor Air Quality?

[et_pb_section fb_built="1" _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_row _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" width_tablet="" width_phone="90%" width_last_edited="on|desktop" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_blurb title="How Important is Indoor Air Quality?" alt="Indoor Air Quality" _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" header_level="h1" header_font="||on||||||" header_text_align="center" header_text_color="#58a618" header_font_size="36px" background_image="https://www.livingstoneconstruction.com/img/Indoor_Air_Quality.jpg" custom_padding="315px||||false|false" custom_padding_tablet="200px||||false|false" custom_padding_phone="||||false|false" custom_padding_last_edited="on|phone" box_shadow_style="preset4" box_shadow_horizontal="0px" box_shadow_vertical="-3.5em" box_shadow_color="rgba(255,255,255,0.76)" box_shadow_position="inner" box_shadow_vertical_tablet="-3em" box_shadow_vertical_phone="-5em" box_shadow_vertical_last_edited="on|phone" locked="off" global_colors_info="{}"][/et_pb_blurb][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" locked="off" global_colors_info="{}"]Green Certifications Part 2 (Read part 1 here) Homebuyers today are increasingly concerned about the indoor air quality of their homes. Issues like mold, radon, carbon monoxide and toxic chemicals have received greater attention than ever as poor indoor air quality has been linked to a host of health problems. A Wellness-Within-Your-Walls (WWYW) certification is a good way to ensure healthy indoor air. WWYW is an informational resource group created to provide education and guidance on chemicals commonly found in living environments. Check out the Ready Residence, which is soon to be the first WWYW certified home in N.C.Many years ago we built a home for Steve and Betty. Like all of our homes, it was certified and very energy efficient. Steve and Betty told us that they wanted to provide their own cabinets from a company that is known for “do it yourself” because it was less expensive. We tried talking them out of this decision but they had their hearts set on it. On the day that the cabinet parts were delivered to the site, we asked Steve who was going to put together the cabinets? (The cabinets came unassembled in flat boxes and reeked of formaldehyde). Steve was shocked, he hadn’t thought about who would put them together (or install) his cabinets. Once he realized how heavy they were, he decided to have our trim carpenters do it for him. After the cabinets were assembled and installed, it cost more than if they had gone with a decent quality wood/plywood cabinet. Not only that, but the home was now filled with off-gassing particle board. It was only a few years later that I remember Betty was diagnosed with cancer. Obviously we cannot prove the causation, but the correlation is certainly reason for alarm. If you're building a custom home, you are likely not planning to sell it any time soon. Aging-In-Place certifications are also important if you're building your forever home.New homes are much tighter than homes built before the first energy efficient legislation in 1978. However, even if your home is built and certified Energy Star, there is no documentation for the quality of the contents pertaining to air. Homes built to earn the Indoor airPLUS label include features to reduce contaminants that can lead to poor indoor air quality, including mold, moisture, radon, carbon monoxide, toxic chemicals and more. Unfortunately, homeowners are not taught of the dangers that home furnishings can present when brought into the home after completion.   A few things to consider regarding indoor air quality when building your new custom home: Up to 90% of our time is spent indoors 750,000 new asthma cases per year in the U.S. alone Childhood asthma has increased 600% in the last 30 years Homes built today are much tighter than just a few years before and fresh air is hard to get into the home Danger Level 1 Contaminants (in a home) include toxic compounds such as: Building materials Furniture Carpets Paints Cleaning chemicals Flame retardants and other chemicals have been used for decades in the production of commercial and residential upholstered furniture as a method for achieving fire protection. The California Air Resources Board (CARB) has classified formaldehyde as a Toxic Air Contaminant, based on its potential to cause cancer and other adverse health effects.What is formaldehyde? Formaldehyde is a colorless gas. At elevated concentrations it has a strong, pungent odor and can be irritating to the eyes, nose, and lungs. Formaldehyde is released into the home from a variety of indoor sources. Some resins, or glues, used to bind wood chips or fibers into plywood, particleboard, and other pressed wood products, contain formaldehyde. Cabinetry and some floor and wall materials are often made from such products. Formaldehyde is also used in fabrics to impart wrinkle resistance or to fix color, and in some consumer products it is used as a hardening agent or preservative. Also, formaldehyde is a by-product of cabinetry, and gas appliances are common sources of two combustion processes, such as wood burning, gas appliance use, and cigarette smoking. Formaldehyde is usually present at lower (but not necessarily healthful) levels in outdoor air; it is emitted in some industrial sources, and is also created from chemical reactions in the air among combustion pollutants, such as those in automobile exhaust. Some common sources of formaldehyde indoors: Pressed wood products: particleboard, plywood, medium-density fiberboard (MDF); often used in cabinetry, and wall and floor materials Consumer Products: fingernail hardeners, nail polish,
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Should I Go Green?

Should I Go Green?

[et_pb_section fb_built="1" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" custom_margin="||||false|true" custom_padding="||||false|true" locked="off" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_row _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" width_tablet="" width_phone="100%" width_last_edited="on|phone" custom_padding="9px||10px|||" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_blurb title="Should I Go Green?" alt="Design Forever Home" _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" header_level="h1" header_font="||on||||||" header_text_align="center" header_text_color="#58a618" background_image="https://www.livingstoneconstruction.com/img/Featured-Images-1920-×-900-px.jpg" custom_padding="200px||||false|false" box_shadow_style="preset4" box_shadow_horizontal="0px" box_shadow_vertical="-55px" box_shadow_color="rgba(255,255,255,0.76)" box_shadow_position="inner" global_colors_info="{}"][/et_pb_blurb][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"]Green Certifications Part 1 (Read part 2 here) Today many builders and home buyers are concerned about preserving the environment. With increased attention on the condition of our planet, “green building” has become a sought after choice for homeowners, especially in our market. But what does green building mean? In its simplest terms, green building is making your home the best it can be. It means increasing your home’s efficiency so it makes better use of things like water, energy, temperature control, and construction materials. It’s about using resources effectively so you reduce the impact of your home on the environment, buying local, and creating a healthy indoor air environment. While building an environmentally friendly home sounds good to most people, they usually want to know two things: what can I do and how much will it cost me? Let’s address the last question first. You may have heard that building green is more expensive. While that may be true in some instances, it doesn’t have to be. In today’s market some elements of green building can cost more initially, but many do not, and some even cost less. Factor in energy savings over time and the increased durability of many of the green building products, and any additional up- front cost becomes much easier to justify. Also, some mortgage companies now offer reduced mortgage rates to homes built green, and green homes are worth more than non-certified green homes. To answer the other question, let’s take a look at a few things you can do to make your new home more environmentally friendly. Heating and Cooling Equipment: One of the most important things you can do to make your home more “green” is to carefully consider your choice of heating and cooling equipment. The heating/air conditioning system should be built and installed with the highest SEER (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio) rating possible. The greater the SEER rating, the more energy efficient your unit will be. The system should also be sized appropriately to effectively cool or heat your home without being oversized. In fact, it is often better to err on the side of being undersized by half a ton than oversized. (Note: A “ton” is a unit of energy used to measure output. Typically you need about one ton of output for every 400 square feet of your home.) Many builders don’t recommend that you oversize the tonnage of your home’s AC system. The most efficient homes often run on a system designed to be 10 percent smaller than typical installations. A good air system should also be installed with as few bends and connections in the duct work as possible to minimize the risk of gaps and voids. Insulation: If it’s within your budget, one great option is to have your home insulated with a CARB II complaint foam product. When installed correctly, foam can be quite effective. On top of the good R-values (a term used to measure how well insulation resists the flow of heat or cold through it) foam can fill cracks and crevices in ways that traditional insulation can’t. If a foam product can’t be used, great care should be exercised to make sure the installation is done to eliminate as many gaps and penetrations as possible. Home Orientation: To reduce energy loads, it’s important to design and position the house in such a way as to minimize exposure to the hot sun while taking advantage of cooling breezes. Whenever possible, the front door or the house’s longest wall should be set to within 5 degrees of true south. It may also be important to landscape in such a way to create wind breaks for the home or create shade to increase efficiency. Good window placement can increase natural light while reducing the need for electric lighting. These decisions are taken into account when designing a home for passive heating and cooling. Windows and Doors: Windows help make a home beautiful, but they can also waste a lot of energy if they let in heat in the summer, cold in the winter, and drafts anytime. To get more energy-efficient windows, select ones with good insulation values. Some have special coatings that can help repel heat. Others are double- or triple-paned which helps insulation. Some energy- efficient windows have non-toxic gas between the panes such as argon or krypton that provide better insulation than air. Even the window frames can affect how efficient they are. For example, aluminum frames typically provide lowest insulation level. Wood,
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How To Plan Your Forever Home

How To Plan Your Forever Home

[et_pb_section fb_built="1" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" custom_margin="||||false|true" custom_padding="||24px||false|true" locked="off" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_row _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" width_tablet="" width_phone="100%" width_last_edited="on|phone" custom_padding="9px||10px|||" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_image src="https://www.livingstoneconstruction.com/img/Plan_Forever_Home_header.jpg" alt="Design Forever Home" title_text="Plan_Forever_Home_header" _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" width_tablet="" width_phone="90%" width_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]Aging In Place If you ask someone who is ready to build a new home, they will often tell you that “This is the last home I will ever build. They will have to bury me in the back yard.” If you’re building a forever home, it’s always a good idea to consider designing your home for Aging- In-Place. Good Aging-In-Place considerations will include an elevator (or shaft), curbless showers, wider doorways, lever door handles, and an extra emphasis on lighting to name a few. This will allow you to live in the home as long as you want or provide better resale-ability should you choose to sell your home in the future.You also will want to consider your Indoor Air Quality. An often overlooked aspect of homebuilding that is becoming more important as homes are built tighter (read more here). If you're building a forever home, a Wellness-Within-Your-Walls certification is a good way to ensure healthy indoor air. Check out the Ready Residence, which is soon to be the first WWYW certified home in N.C. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]The Only Constant Even if it is the last home you will ever build, you should be prepared for plans to change. Recent surveys show that most people live in their home an average of five years, and you’re probably not much different. You may be thinking, but this really is going to be my last home. And if it is, that’s great. But you may want to consider the reality of averages.A client of ours (who we'll call Susan) took more than a year to design her new home for her family, only to discover she was way over budget. She also realized that by the time she completed her home construction, all but one of her five children would be away at college, and she had designed bedrooms for each of them! Reality finally dawned on her—within a few short years, she and her husband would be empty-nesters. Designing her home for a family of seven thinking this would be her home for the rest of her life didn’t fit the reality of Susan’s imminent transition to a home for two.[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]Priorities When designing your custom home, first design for your immediate needs. Second, take into account what market conditions will allow for your particular home design. Third, give strong consideration to how long you may live in your home. Susan may shift gears and design a home that’s perfect for her family’s needs for the next five to seven years, with a plan to downsize at that time. With this more realistic outlook, she may give additional consideration to the resale value of her choices. Don’t make the mistake of over-designing a home that may become obsolete for your family within a short period of time. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]Bottom Line Be realistic about your short-term and long-term needs and how long you will live in your new home, then design accordingly.[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section fb_built="1" specialty="on" _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" custom_padding="39px|||||" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_column type="2_3" specialty_columns="2" _builder_version="4.16" custom_padding="|||" global_colors_info="{}" custom_padding__hover="|||"][et_pb_row_inner _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_column_inner saved_specialty_column_type="2_3" _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" header_font="|||||on|||" header_text_color="rgba(17,32,73,0.79)" header_font_size="54px" header_2_font="||||||||" header_2_font_size="34px" custom_margin="||||false|false" header_font_size_tablet="39px" header_font_size_phone="38px" header_font_size_last_edited="on|desktop" header_2_font_tablet="||||||||" header_2_font_phone="||||||||" header_2_font_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]Building A Quality Custom Home Want to know more? This book by Sean Sullivan is full of helpful information in easy-to-read chapters like this blog post. It is a step-by-step guide to the “must-know” issues of building your dream home. Discover the custom-home construction secrets that could save you headaches, heartaches, and thousands (if not tens of thousands) of dollars.[/et_pb_text][et_pb_button button_url="https://www.livingstoneconstruction.com/building-a-quality-custom-home" button_text="Learn More" _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][/et_pb_button][/et_pb_column_inner][/et_pb_row_inner][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_3" _builder_version="4.16" custom_padding="|||" global_colors_info="{}" custom_padding__hover="|||"][et_pb_image src="https://www.livingstoneconstruction.com/img/Untitled-design-8.png" alt="Building A Custom Home" title_text="Custom Home Book" _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" custom_padding="3px|||||" global_colors_info="{}"][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_section]
Resources for Radon-Resistant Construction

Resources for Radon-Resistant Construction

[et_pb_section fb_built="1" disabled_on="off|off|off" admin_label="Post" _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" z_index="0" custom_padding="34px|16px|10px|16px|false|true" hover_enabled="0" locked="off" global_colors_info="{}" custom_padding_last_edited="on|phone" custom_padding_phone="34px|0px|10px|0px|false|true" sticky_enabled="0" custom_padding_tablet="34px|16px|10px|16px|false|true"][et_pb_row column_structure="1_2,1_2" _builder_version="4.17.4" _module_preset="default" background_enable_color="off" hover_enabled="0" global_colors_info="{}" use_custom_gutter="on" gutter_width="2" width_last_edited="on|phone" sticky_enabled="0" width_phone="90%"][et_pb_column type="1_2" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_text admin_label="Title" module_class="chronospro-heading green-heading" _builder_version="4.16" background_layout="dark" module_alignment="left" custom_margin="18px||15px|||" border_style="solid" locked="off" global_colors_info="{}"]How to Ensure Your Home is Radon-Resistant[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" header_font="QuestaGrande Reg|300|||||||" header_text_color="#7BADB6" header_font_size="42px" header_3_font="QuestaGrande Reg||||||||" header_3_text_color="#7BADB6" header_3_font_size="48px" text_orientation="center" global_colors_info="{}"]Radon is a naturally occurring odorless, colorless gas and is the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers, and the second leading cause of lung cancer overall. Nearly 1 out of 15 homes in the U.S. is estimated to have elevated radon levels.[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_2" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_image src="https://www.livingstoneconstruction.com/img/02-18-Wolfe-Cove-Rd-Asheville-2.jpg" alt="Living Stone Design+Build The Modern Farmhouse Yard Landscaping" title_text="asheville modern farmhouse yard landscaping" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row column_structure="1_2,1_2" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_column type="1_2" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_image src="https://www.livingstoneconstruction.com/img/Untitled-design-22.jpg" title_text="Untitled design (22)" disabled_on="on|on|off" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_2" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" header_2_font_size="30px" global_colors_info="{}"]Homes built using radon-resistant construction techniques helps builders and contractors to better serve their clients by helping to reduce buyers’ risk of lung cancer from exposure to radon in indoor air. Using common materials and straightforward techniques, builders can construct new homes that are resistant to radon entry.[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row column_structure="1_2,1_2" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_column type="1_2" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" header_2_font_size="30px" global_colors_info="{}"]Below are several resources provided by the EPA to help educate about radon, and ensure that more homes are radon-resistant Builder and Contractor Resources for Radon-Resistant New Construction Radon-Resistant Construction Basics and Techniques  Radon Standards of Practice A Citizens Guide to Radon: The Guide to Protecting Yourself and Your Family from Radon  Building Radon Out: A Step-by-Step Guide on How to Build Radon-Resistant Homes Find a Radon Test Kit or Measurement and Mitigation Professional Radon FAQs  [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_2" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_image src="https://www.livingstoneconstruction.com/img/rosenburg_68-scaled.jpg" alt="Living Stone Design+Build Rosenberg Porch" title_text="weaverville modern barn house porch" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section fb_built="1" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_row _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_image src="https://www.livingstoneconstruction.com/img/unnamed.jpg" _builder_version="4.16" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]
Top 12 Mistakes Made by Homeowners

Top 12 Mistakes Made by Homeowners

[et_pb_section fb_built="1" _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" custom_margin="||||false|true" custom_padding="||||false|true" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_row _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" width_tablet="" width_phone="100%" width_last_edited="on|phone" custom_padding="9px||10px|||" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_image src="https://www.livingstoneconstruction.com/img/top-12-mistakes-Made-by-Homeowners-scaled.jpg" title_text="top 12 mistakes Made by Homeowners" _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" width="85%" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]Building a Quality Custom Home Mistakes are Unavoidable. I've made a few myself, I’ve learned a lot from them, and I want to share that knowledge. This blog post is a chapter from my book Building a Quality Custom Home. It‘s meant to help homeowners through the entire custom-home building process, with easy-to-read practical information.[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]What are the top 12 mistakes made by homeowners?[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]1. Purchasing a lot that is “affordable.”  You could build a home with a great design and great features and finishes, but if you build it in the wrong location or on the wrong lot, you could be in real trouble.Solution: Remember: location, location, location. Purchase the best lot you can manage, even if it means waiting an extra year before beginning construction.[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]2. Trying to build a custom home without a professional builder. Building a custom home is more complex than most people realize. It takes skilled professionals years to learn the business and even then changes in the industry, materials, and codes make it difficult to keep up.Solution: Find a competent builder you can trust. Negotiate a reasonable fee for their services and hire them.[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]3. Purchasing a ready-made plan thinking it will save you money. Building someone else’s design or dream (especially one that was designed for someone in another city and state) may not be the wisest choice.Solution: Purchase a ready-made plan only if your lot is standard and you don’t need to modify the plan.[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]4. Choosing a builder primarily because of price. The expression “you get what you pay for” applies to the homebuilding process. If you’ve heard horror stories about people’s experience with their builder, it usually can be attributed to someone trying to get a deal.Solution: Your home is a major investment. Make an informed, purposeful, thoughtful decision and don’t be lured by the lowest bid.[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]5. Biting off more than you can chew. In an appreciating market, the rise in value can cover this mistake, but in a flat or declining market, it can be disastrous.Solution: Know what you can afford and stick to your budget.[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]6. Hiring a builder when your gut instinct tells you not to. Solution: After careful research and comparing builders, go with your instinct, not the discounted price.[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]7. Making choices for your home that only you love but everyone else hates. Solution: Get good counsel from your builder, architect, interior designer, and real estate professional before you make your decisions.[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]8. Expecting workers to be on your job every day from 7:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. Solution: Recognize that some days no work is scheduled at all because inspections may be taking place, or a project that started before yours requires follow-up work, or rain has caused a change in the schedule.[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]9. Underestimating the importance of making all selections before construction. Solution: Make all selections prior to construction and enjoy the building process.[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]10. Homeowners giving direction to subcontractors on the job. Solution: Communicate only with the superintendent or interior designer. The superintendent is the only person on the job who has all the information related to your project. Subcontractors have only one piece of the puzzle. You can visit the job site during scheduled appointments with the superintendent who can answer your questions and explain what you will be seeing.[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]11. Not understanding the “Change Order” process. Solution: Discuss the builder’s Change Order process with him and be sure you are clear with how it works. Cooperating fully with this process will go a long way toward your enjoyment of the whole project.[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" header_2_line_height="1.4em" header_2_font_size_tablet="" header_2_font_size_phone="24px" header_2_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" global_colors_info="{}"]12. Moving in before the punch list is complete. If you move in before you have signed off on the completion of the punch list, what would normally take 2 weeks will take up to 6 months due to working around the homeowner’s schedule, extra cleaning, touch-ups, etc.Solution: Finalize the punch list and agree on its completion before moving into your new home.[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]
25 Days of Giving

25 Days of Giving

[et_pb_section fb_built="1" _builder_version="3.22" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_row _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" global_colors_info="{}"][et_pb_text admin_label="Title" module_class="chronospro-heading green-heading" _builder_version="4.10.7" header_text_align="left" header_2_text_align="left" header_2_text_color="#727272" header_2_font_size="30px" module_alignment="left" custom_margin="||||false|false" hover_enabled="0" border_style="solid" locked="off" global_colors_info="{}" sticky_enabled="0"]And an Anniversary Party To celebrate our 25th anniversary, we've chosen 25 charities, and will be donating to one per day for 25 days leading up to our Anniversary Party. Our Anniversary Party will be an opportunity for us to honor our past and current clients, and our trade partners.  Each of our 23 Living Stone employees have chosen a charity or non-profit. The two other organizations are the Black Mountain Fire Department, and the Black Mountain Police department because they have served us while the Living Stone Office has been in their jurisdiction over the past 25 years.[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.10.7" _module_preset="default" header_3_font="||||on||||" header_3_text_color="#58a618" header_3_font_size="27px" header_3_line_height="1.7em" header_4_text_color="#675c53" header_4_font_size="27px" global_colors_info="{}"]1: Oceana, May 2nd Oceana is dedicated to protecting and restoring the world’s oceans on a global scale. Aundrea Hutchinson, Administrative Assistant "I chose this charity because of my passion for marine life and the restoration of the world's oceans. In restoring the world's fish populations and protecting their habitat, sustainable meals can be provided to one billion people each day." 2: The Children's Center of Transylvania County, May 3rd We believe every child deserves a safe, nurturing, and healthy home environment. Austin Fox, Superintendent "Nothing upsets me more than an innocent child being raised by an abusive parent. A child’s home and their parents are the world to that child. It should be a safe haven of life not a prison of torture and hate. That is one of the most evil things that exists in our communities."  3: St. Jude's Research Hospital, May 4th The mission of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is to advance cures, and means of prevention, for pediatric catastrophic diseases through research and treatment. Consistent with the vision of our founder Danny Thomas, no child is denied treatment based on race, religion or a family's ability to pay. Chris Hamlin, Field Operator "I like that children get the help they need and families don’t have to worry about the cost." 4: Organization for Autism Research, May 5th OAR's mission is to apply research to the challenges of autism. Corey Tyree, Carpenter "I like that children get the help they need and families don’t have to worry about the cost." 5: Micah Cornerstone Ministries, May 6th The mission is to be a Christ-centered, gospel-oriented ministry, acting on the commandments of God in accordance with the core of Micah 6:8; "…do justice, love kindness, walk humbly with God." Coy Davis, Superintendent "This ministry has a heart for breaking the chains of generational poverty, by raising up and equipping men with a talent to serve their communities and provide for their families. They share our core values in many aspects in the way they humbly serve. I partnered with them for many years in Honduras."  6: Black Mountain Home for Children, Youth and Families, May 9th In 2008, Black Mountain Home began offering youth who have earned a high school diploma or GED the option of remaining in care while furthering their education or working toward a career goal.  Youth in the program are expected to pursue some form of continuing education such as college, vocational training, an apprenticeship, a certificate program, or other approved educational program. Housing is provided in the Ray Campbell Independent Living Village on the main campus. Jim Crust, Superintendent "I believe that people that work in the trades are a dying breed and we need to start encouraging kids to get back into the trades and learn a skill." 7: Trout Unlimited, May 10th Trout Unlimited's mission is to bring together diverse interests to care for and recover rivers and streams, so our children can experience the joy of wild and native trout and salmon. Johnny Rummel, Carpenter "Riparian ecosystems are very important. It's for the trout man" 8: The Mountaineers, May 11th The Mountaineers' mission is to enrich lives and communities by helping people explore, conserve, learn about, and enjoy the lands and waters of the Pacific Northwest and Beyond  John Rijhoff "They give back to the local community. They get people outdoors and I volunteered with them for 10 years." 9: 106.9 WMIT the Light (Radio Station), May 12th Blue Ridge Broadcasting exists to lead as many people as possible into a personal and dynamic relationship with Jesus Christ and encourages our listeners in spiritual maturity and active service for Christ. Judy Berkley, Controller "I listen every work morning, and it helps to keep my mind in the right place spiritually throughout the day.  Occasionally I am traveling between business locations and get to hear some preaching in the morning.  It seems, without fail, that the message is something relevant to my life." 10: Preservation Society of Asheville and Buncombe Co, May 13th
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